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The FBI and the Department of Justice may not charge some of the rioters who participated in the January 6 Capitol insurrection.

According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, federal law enforcement officials are privately debating if they shouldn’t charge some of the hundreds of Trump supporters who stormed their way into the U.S. capitol earlier this month.

Their concerned that the hundreds of cases would flood local courthouses.

As for now, discussions are in the early stages, and a decision has not been made, sources close to the matter said.

Federal officials have worked hard to identify and arrest those who participated in the riot, as they promised they would. However, charging every person may not be the best course of action, sources stated.

It has been estimated that roughly 800 people forced their way into the historic building.

Thanks to pictures, videos, and witnesses, officials learned that some rioters vandalized the property, some arrived in military battle gear, and others were just following the crowd. Some officials say for the latter group that unlawfully entered the building and did not act violently or pose threats should not be charged.

But some agents beg to differ. In their opinion, a message should be sent, and rioters should be the example that that kind of violence and destruction will not be tolerated. Therefore, everyone involved should be punished to the full extent of the law, the news outlet reported.

The DOJ has already charged one hundred thirty-five people for committing crimes in or on the capitol grounds. Many more are expected to follow over the next weeks and months.

Federal agents will primarily focus on which individuals helped plan the attack and urged for violence. Prosecutors are looking to charge them with seditious conspiracy—which has a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

The FBI has already found concerning connections of some extremist groups including, the Proud Boys, Oath Keepers, and Three Percenters. It is looking to see if those groups coordinated with each other to storm the building.

Investigators anticipate some rioters will eventually work with them and provide evidence against others.

There may be plea deals for those that are only charged with unlawful entry.




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Vanessa Bryant Files Complaint To Publicly Name Sheriff’s Deputies Accused Of Sharing Kobe Crash Photos

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Vanessa Bryant wants the four Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies that she alleges shared “unauthorized” photos of the helicopter crash site that killed her husband, Kobe Bryant, their daughter, and seven others named publicly.

According to KTLA, county lawyers want to keep the deputies’ identities sealed. They argue that releasing them would make the deputies’ information public and potentially targets for hackers and bullies.

Bryant’s attorneys filed an amended complaint in federal court, adding the four deputies and the L.A. County Fire Department to her civil rights lawsuit against the Sheriff’s Department and the county.

Vanessa posted on her Instagram Stories, “Kobe’s name was released when he was accused in 2003. Why should sheriffs get away with hiding? #doublestandard.”

Bryant’s lawsuit seeks damages for negligence and invasion of privacy, alleging that deputies and firefighters took photos and shared the images of the victims who died in the Jan. 26, 2020 crash.




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Authorities Say Shaquille O’Neal’s Atlanta Krispy Kreme Fire Was Arson

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The fire that destroyed Shaquille O’Neal’s Atlanta landmark Krispy Kreme Doughnuts location earlier this month has been ruled an act of arson.

On Friday, the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department announced its findings through social media and requested the public’s help to identify their suspect. Two photos were released of the suspect involved, and a $10,000 reward has been offered, Yahoo reports.

Officials did not say how the February 10 fire started. Two employees were working in the store’s drive-thru at the time of the tragedy but luckily escaped safely after seeing wires smoking.

Firefighters were able to salvage most of the building, the outlet reported.

The location was opened in 1965 as part of the franchise’s initial expansion away from North Carolina. Shaq acquired it in 2016, who later became a global spokesman for the company.

It’s unknown when the store will reopen, but the NBA Hall of Famer says that they “will be back stronger the

an ever.”




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FBI Zeroes In On Suspect In Capitol Officer Brian Sicknick’s Death

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According to officials, the FBI has zeroed in on an unidentified suspect in the death of Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick. Sicknick lost his life due to injuries sustained during the January 6 siege at the U.S. Capitol Building.

CNN reports that initial reports of Sicknick being attacked with a fire extinguisher, which turned out to be untrue. Instead, the theory is he became ill from the bear spray used by the angry mob during the attacks. It was previously reported that Sicknick made it back to his office, where he collapsed. He later died at an area hospital.

“We are awaiting toxicology results and continue to work with other government agencies regarding the death investigation,” U.S. Capitol Police said in a statement.

Newly surfaced video footage is credited with helping investigators narrow down the suspect pool. Despite having video footage and photographs of the attack, investigators have struggled to build a strong murder case in Sicknick’s death. It’s not clear what charges the unknown suspect will face.

“Officer Sicknick’s family has asked for privacy during this difficult time and that the spreading of misinformation stop regarding the cause of his death,” said the statement from Capitol Police. “The Department and the Sicknick family appreciate the outpouring of support for our fallen officer.”

Sicknick, a New Jersey native, laid in state at the Capitol Building earlier this month, an honor typically reserved for the United States government leaders. President Joe Biden, First Lady Jill Biden, and congressional leaders came to the ceremony to pay their respects to the fallen officer. 




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